The Miami Heat still owes a bundle of cash to a bunch of veterans. How it breaks down - Brotalnia

The Miami Heat still owes a bundle of cash to a bunch of veterans. How it breaks down

With the Heat standing well above next season’s projected $101 million salary cap, here’s a look at the remaining contractual commitments to players under contract through at least next season and potentially beyond:

Hassan Whiteside: Due

With the Heat standing well above next season’s projected $101 million salary cap, here’s a look at the remaining contractual commitments to players under contract through at least next season and potentially beyond:

Hassan Whiteside: Due $24.4 million next season and a player option for $27.1 million in 2019-20.

Goran Dragic: Due $18.1 million next season, with a $19.2 million player option for 2019-20.

Josh Richardson: Due $9.4 million, $10.1 million, $10.9 million, $11.6 million each of the next four seasons.

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James Johnson: Due $14.4 million and $15.1 million in the next two seasons, with a $15.8 million player option in 2020-21.

Dion Waiters: Due $12.7 million, $13.3 million and $13.9 million the next three seasons.

Kelly Olynyk: Due $11.1 million and $11.7 million the next two seasons, with a $12.2 player option for 2020-21.

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Dwyane Wade discusses Hassan Whiteside’s performance and his scuffle with Justin Anderson after the Miami Heat’s Game 3 loss to the Philadelphia 76ers on April 19, 2018. David Santiago

Tyler Johnson: Due $19.2 million each of the next two seasons.

Justise Winslow: Due $3.4 million and $4.7 million the next two seasons.

Bam Adebayo: Due $2.9 million, $3.5 million and $5.1 million in the next three seasons, provided Heat picks up player option in the last of those three years. Heat also can maintain his rights if it exercises a $7.1 million option in 2021-22.

Rodney McGruder: Due non-guaranteed $1.54 million next season.

Jordan Mickey: Has a $1.6 million team option for next season.

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RICHARDSON’S END

Richardson’s first-half time playing time in Game 5 was limited to 1:33 because of foul trouble. But his second half playing time was limited to 5:49 primarily because he was hampered by a sprained AC joint in his left shoulder.

“It was tough,” he said. “Every time I would do something, it was popping. Every time I would make contact with someone and try to move it quickly, it was popping. It was very uncomfortable.”

Richardson said he and Erik Spoelstra discussed the possibility of him not returning to the game in the later stages of the third quarter and fourth because of the shoulder.

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Miami Heat’s Erik Spoelstra talks about Josh Richardson’s versatility and his improvement since last year on March 14, 2018. Manny Navarro[email protected]

“They kind of kept asking me in the third quarter, fourth quarter,” Richardson said. “They asked me twice. I said it hurts, it keeps popping. But if I need to go back in, I will do it. I didn’t have a problem going back in. But they didn’t think it was best for me to go back. It’s fine.”

So why did he attempt to play in the game at all? “I feel like if I can walk, I will try to play. I could not go out there and not give it a go.”

Richardson missed his only shot and had no points or rebounds but one block in Game 5.

Speaking of his season overall, he said: “I’m proud of how I played this year. I improved in a lot of different ways. I’m glad I was able to stay healthy as long as I was.”

ADEBAYO PLAN

In the wake of Tuesday’s loss, center Bam Abebayo vowed to improve after a promising rookie season.

“The summer is all about working,” he said. “So this summer I’m just going to get in the gym. I’m going to be prepared even more than this year.”

Offensively, he will continue to work on his “post game every day and jump shots.”

So is he a center or power forward?

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Miami Heat’s Bam Adebayo talks about playing alongside Hassan Whiteside on Feb. 6, 2018. Manny Navarro[email protected]

“Man, I’m a basketball player, pretty much,” he said. “I just go out there and do what I got to do with this team. Whatever Coach needs me to do, I do.”

▪ Philadelphia outscored Miami by an average of 15.6 points in the second half of the five games.

“Each one of the games, except for Game 2, they stepped up their defense in the fourth quarter and it was tough for us to generate good, clean offense or at least get the ball to where we want it to go and execute with some level of coherency,” Spoelstra said. “But you have to credit them. They have very good length and a good system. They’re well-coached, well-drilled and have a big in the paint that can fill in the gaps in a lot of different areas.”

▪ Though there were several mini-altercations during the series (never any punches), the Heat was gracious in the postgame aftermath, staying on the court to congratulate Sixers players.

“This league is a fraternity,” James Johnson said. “We’re going to see them guys in summer time. I’m sure a lot of them are going to come to Miami and hang out. It’s never personal, it’s always business. After the job is done regardless of whether they won or we won you got to hug it up and respect your opponents.”

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